According to the authoritative data agency InnovaDatabase, 187 new products using rooibos sweetener were released in the U.S. market, an increase of 140% over the same period last year; and in the whole of last year, the growth rate of new products using rooibos sweetener in the U.S. market was as high as 70% over the previous year. With such a high and sustained growth rate, the development prospects of rooibos can’t help but draw attention to itself.

  When it comes to Monk Fruit, many people’s first reaction is its traditional medicinal and health care functions of detoxifying heat, resolving phlegm and relieving cough, clearing the lungs and moistening the intestines, and quenching thirst. However, in foreign countries, especially in Europe and the United States, people’s knowledge of Monk Fruit begins with its “non-traditional” effect: the sweet substance it contains, Monk Fruit Sweeteners. Because of its sweetness (300 times sweeter than cane sugar), non-caloric, natural, and good taste properties, in recent years, Monk Fruit sweetener has gone from being unknown to being widely accepted by the food and beverage industry in Europe and the US, becoming an ideal natural and healthy sugar substitute sweetener.

Due to the sweet taste of regional populations, traditionally, western societies, represented by the United States, have used sugar in large quantities as a sweetening product in the food and beverage industry. However, with the high intake of sugar leading to serious health problems such as obesity, diabetes and dental caries, an “anti-sugar movement” has emerged in Western societies and artificial sweeteners such as acesulfame, aspartame, sucralose and other zero-calorie, low-cost sweeteners have gradually emerged. However, in the process, there have been many safety concerns and controversies surrounding artificial sweeteners.2

  Due to the sweet taste of regional populations, sugar has traditionally been used in large quantities as a sweetening product in the food and beverage industry in Western societies, represented by the United States. However, as the high intake of sugar has led to serious health problems such as obesity, diabetes, and dental caries, an “anti-sugar movement” has emerged in Western societies, and zero-calorie, inexpensive artificial sweeteners such as acesulfame, aspartame, and sucralose have gradually emerged. However, in this process, the many safety hazards and controversies of artificial sweeteners have been incessant.

  Since the beginning of the 21st century, along with all the controversies about the health disadvantages of traditional sugar and the safety risks of emerging artificial sweeteners, the food and beverage industry has gradually turned its attention to natural sweeteners that have both zero calorie (low calorie) and health advantages. Stevioside, extracted from stevia, became the first natural sweetener to be used on a large scale, and it has rapidly developed and attracted widespread attention. However, steviol glycosides have a weakness that is difficult to overcome: they have a pronounced aftertaste of bitterness in the mouth, which affects the taste of food and beverages. In contrast, rooibos sweetener has multiple advantages such as zero calorie, good taste and pure nature, so it has become a new favorite in the food and beverage industry in recent years, and is currently the most ideal natural sweetener.

  In fact, rooibos sweeteners are far from attracting attention only in recent years, and their research history can even be traced back to decades ago. As early as 1975, Dr. C.H. Lee’s paper published in the British Journal of Science and Technology identified rosmarinic sweetener as a component of rosmarinic sweetness. And in the early 1990s, Procter & Gamble developed and patented a method for producing sweeteners for rooibos fruit juice. However, due to factors such as technical stability, lack of supply chain support and the scale of demand at that time, Monk Fruit sweetener was not commercialized at that time.

  Monk Fruit sweetener was really introduced to the market in the early 21st century. Ltd. (formerly known as Guilin Ji Fusi Biotechnology Co., Ltd.), established in Guilin, Guangxi, the origin and main production area of Monk Fruit, successfully broke through the bottlenecks of extraction technology, efficiency, and product stability, and established a complete supply chain system for Monk Fruit for the first time, and introduced the first batch of Monk Fruit sweeteners to the market that could be used on a large scale This laid a solid foundation for the rapid and stable development of the Monk Fruit sweetener industry, and thus reignited the interest of international companies such as Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Nestle and Cargill in Monk Fruit. Ltd. successfully passed the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) certification in the U.S. for the first time in January 2010 and got the golden key to open the U.S. market for Monk Fruit sweetener, officially blowing the trumpet of Monk Fruit sweetener entering the overseas market on a large scale.
Perhaps, we can get a glimpse of the market development history and trend of Monk Fruit sweetener from the following set of figures: Before receiving FDA approval in 2010, the demand for Monk Fruit sweetener in the U.S. market was only 10 tons per year; and after receiving FDA approval, its annual demand grew rapidly to 20 tons in 2011 and 40 tons in 2012, and it is estimated that the demand will grow to about 80 tons in 2015. demand will grow to about 80 tons.2

  Perhaps we can get a glimpse of the market development and trend of rooibos sweetener from the following set of figures: before receiving FDA approval in 2010, the demand for rooibos sweetener in the U.S. market was only 10 tons per year; after receiving FDA approval, the annual demand grew rapidly to 20 tons in 2011 and 40 tons in 2012, and it is estimated that the demand will grow to about 80 tons in 2015. demand will grow to about 80 tons.

  The hot momentum of rooibos sweetener is not only reflected in the exponential growth in demand. As a fruit-based natural sweetener product with zero calories, good taste, and no side effects, the high added value of rooibos sweetener has gained the favor of many large, high-quality companies in the food and beverage industry, including large cereal brand Kashi Cereal (a brand of Knorr), Johnson & Johnson’s Nectresse brand, U.S. Greek-style yogurt leader Chobani, Borghaus Farms ( Campbell’s Soup brand), Hyland’s Dairy Products (the largest dairy joint venture in the U.S.), Nestle, Ufresh, Coca-Cola (Zico brand), General Mills’ brand Uno, and Starbucks have all used rooibos sweetener products in improvements to their existing products as well as in new products. Naturally, the category pioneers have been rewarded the most. With the advantage of first-mover status and more stable product quality and supply, Gifted has a near monopoly on premium branded corporate customers and has long held more than 70% of the market share of the rooibos sweetener market, and is now the largest rooibos sweetener company in the world.

  All signs show that Monk Fruit sweeteners have entered the explosive period of category growth and become the new “potential stock” of the sweetener industry after stevia. The development trend of Monk Fruit sweeteners has also continued from foreign countries to domestic. For example, although still in the market development stage, one of the Monk Fruit sweetener products – Monk Fruit juice has successfully gained the favor of large companies, including the Unity Group, and is currently in short supply.

  And for the development trend and market prospects of Monk Fruit sweeteners, Monk Fruit sweeteners industry is also full of confidence within the industry. The global leader and largest production supplier of Monk Fruit sweetener – Guilin Ji Fusi Monk Fruit Co., Ltd. said that it will massively expand the acquisition of raw materials and production capacity, and continue to focus on the Monk Fruit sweetener industry.